Reprisals

Internet pioneer found dead amid prosecutor 'bullying'

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Aaron Swartz

Zach Carter, Ryan Grim and Ryan J. Reilly – January 12, 2013

Open democracy advocate and internet pioneer Aaron Swartz was found dead Friday in an apparent suicide, flooding the digital spectrum with an outpouring of grief. He was 26 years old.

Swartz spent the last two years fighting federal hacking charges. In July 2011, prosecutor Scott Garland working under U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz, a politician with her eye on the governor's mansion, charged Swartz with four counts of felony misconduct -- charges that were deemed outrageous by internet experts who understood the case, and wholly unnecessary by the parties Swartz was accused of wronging.

Deutsche Bank Whistleblower Goes to the SEC

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December 5, 2012

Eric Ben-Artzi is talking. He’s talking to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). And he’s talking in the public square. Ben-Artzi is blowing the whistle on multi-billion dollar securities violations at Deutsche Bank, the Germany-based global investment bank.

“I never wanted or expected to be a whistleblower,” Ben-Artzi, a former quantitative risk analyst at Deutsche Bank, said. “I reported internally first and extensively, in accordance with bank policies and procedures. As the problem was not acknowledged or corrected, I felt compelled to inform the proper law enforcement authorities. Unfortunately, my family and I are paying a heavy price for doing the right thing.”

Manitoba whistleblower assigned to “non-job” after warning of government fraud

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Tristin Hopper – December 18, 2012

Newly assigned to a “non-job” and with four years to retirement, Manitoba bureaucrat Jack Dalgliesh whiled away the hours by reading the classics; 156 of them to be exact.

“I may have worked at most 10 days a year for roughly $93,000 or $94,000 a year,” the now-retired Mr. Dalgliesh wrote in a message released Tuesday by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

Is Veterans Affairs Canada Targeting This Family?

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Jeff Rose-Martland – November 23, 2012

The brother of a veteran suing Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) for millions says his personal records were accessed by department staff without his permission.

Retired Corporal Dennis Manuge is the driving force behind the SISIP class action lawsuit over pension clawbacks. The suit is now under settlement negotiations and could cost government in excess of $600 million. Last year, Manuge revealed that, in 2009, the Minister of Veterans Affairs was briefed on private details of his medical conditions and finances.

‘Unexplained’ death of Russian whistleblower in UK

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The following are selected extracts

Natalie Huet and Maria Golovnina – November 28, 2012

A Russian businessman helping Swiss prosecutors uncover a powerful fraud syndicate has died in unexplained circumstances near his mansion in Britain, in a chilling twist to a Russian mafia scandal that has strained Moscow’s ties with the West.

Alexander Perepilichny, 44, sought refuge in Britain three years ago and had been helping a Swiss investigation into a Russian money-laundering scheme by providing evidence against corrupt officials, his colleagues and media reports said.

Former Ornge employee sues, alleges she was fired for whistleblowing

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 Allison Jones – November 7, 2012

A former employee of Ornge is suing Ontario's scandal-plagued air ambulance service, saying she was fired for helping to expose alleged wrongdoing.

Lisa Kirbie, hired in March 2010 as the director of government and regulatory affairs, also alleges in her lawsuit that former CEO Chris Mazza was volatile, sexist and treated Ornge as his personal "fiefdom."

Threatening whistleblowers must be outlawed

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John Hemming – October 26, 2012

The Jimmy Savile scandal shows the urgent need for greater protection for people reporting abuse to prevent future cover-ups, MPs have been told. Lib Dem MP John Hemming said abuse victims were often ignored and punished and this could not be "tolerated".

He wants a new law to make it an offence to threaten whistleblowers to stop them reporting wrongdoing. Backing the measure, Tory Nadine Dorries said many big organisations "bred a culture of intimidation".

B.C. rights advocates demand probe of RCMP operation

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CBC News – October 30, 2012

The B.C. Civil Liberties Association is demanding an investigation by the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP into the force’s entire operation against a whistleblower who informed on an officer’s posting of bondage photos on the internet.

The BCCLA said new information in unsealed court documents reveal that the RCMP marshalled apparently disproportionate resources in its investigation of New Westminster, B.C., resident Grant Wakefield, who drew the RCMP’s attention to the photos posted by Port Coquitlam RCMP Cpl. Jim Brown.

The whistleblowers club

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Carola Hoyos – September 14, 2012

They faced down banks, hospitals and defence companies. Now they’re joining forces.

On a quiet spring evening in 1999, Eileen Chubb walked as casually as she could into the office of Isard House, the care home for the elderly in Bromley, Kent where she had been working for the past three years. Glancing over her shoulder, certain she was going to be caught, she picked a ring-binder folder off a high shelf and emptied it of about 70 sheets of medical records.

Whistleblower claims RCMP targeting him

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CBC News – August 27, 2012

A man who complained to the RCMP that one of its officers posted bondage photos online says that after he reported the Mountie, he and his wife were terrorized by police during a raid on their home.

The man, whose name is not being made public, told CBC News that the raid occurred after he reported to the RCMP that Cpl. Jim Brown, of Coquitlam, B.C., had posted several bondage-type photos of himself with women on a website with a purported 1.7 million members.

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