World Bank

Movement Towards International Anticorruption Standards?

Scores: 
4

Matthew Fowler – September 27, 2013

Is the time ripe for a common international anticorruption standard? At a recent World Bank panel discussion regarding “Corruption and PPPs: Challenges and Solutions,” all four panelists – including leaders from the World Bank Group and major international companies – expressed support for such standards.

Some proposed precedents that could serve as models. If there is traction for this idea, it could significantly impact the way companies address anticorruption issues. It might even reduce the incidences of corruption.

Canada now dominates World Bank corruption list, thanks to SNC-Lavalin

Scores: 
3

Ishmael N. Daro – September 17, 2013

Canada leads the world in companies and individuals that have been banned by the World Bank from contributing to international aid and infrastructure projects.

Of the 608 companies and individuals listed on the World Bank’s just-released blacklist for fraudulent or corrupt conduct, 119 are Canadian companies. But engineering firm SNC-Lavalin and its subsidiaries, many of which are registered outside Canada, comprise 16 per cent of the total.

SNC-Lavalin unit barred from World Bank projects for 10 years

Scores: 
4

Lynn Moore – April 17, 2013

The World Bank Group has debarred SNC-Lavalin Group’s key subsidiary from bidding on World Bank projects for 10 years following the company’s misconduct in two projects, including a $1.2-billion bridge project in Bangladesh.

The decade-long debarment is the longest ever levied by the bank’s anticorruption unit and follows its investigation into allegations of a high-level corruption conspiracy involving SNC-Lavalin Inc. and officials in Bangladesh.

World Bank leadership candidate criticized

Scores: 
2

Jim Yong Kim Weak on Whistleblower Protections at Dartmouth

Bea Edwards –April 13, 2012

As president of Dartmouth University, President Obama’s nominee to head the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, presides over extreme, traumatizing, pervasive, revolting and potentially illegal hazing at fraternities. Andrew Lohse, the whistleblower who exposed it, is now, alone, among those charged with misconduct, on the brink of expulsion.

Janet Reitman of Rolling Stone investigated Dartmouth’s infamous fraternity system and described the violence, class privilege and ritual abuse that fraternity pledges must survive in order to join the clubs. On this site, we don’t quite have the stomach to detail the particulars of hazing at Dartmouth, but suffice it to say that the customs mainly involve forcing the younger boys to wallow repeatedly in the bodily emissions of the older ones. Extreme binge drinking is, of course, part of the fun, as well as, inevitably, gang vomiting.

World Bank investigates Canada's SNC-Lavalin

Scores: 
0

April 3, 2012

The World Bank has temporarily barred a unit of Canadian engineering and construction giant SNC-Lavalin from bidding on new projects following a corruption investigation into the Padma bridge project in Bangladesh.

In April 2011, the WB agreed to lend Bangladesh $1.2 billion to build a 6-km bridge over the river Padma to link Dhaka, and the country's main port.

Meet the World Bank’s anti-bribery cop

Scores: 
2
Stephen Zimmermann

Greg McArthur – February 7, 2012

The World Bank doled out more than $57-billion (U.S.) in grants and loans for projects in developing countries in its last fiscal year, a deep pool of money that is aggressively coveted by major multinational contractors and engineering firms.

But sitting behind a desk in Washington, D.C., there’s a former U.S. prosecutor who will not hesitate to try to turn off that tap if he senses a dirty deal – a punishment that, pending the outcome of a continuing criminal probe, could be in store for Canadian engineering giant SNC-Lavalin Group Inc.

The Anatomy of Corruption in Public Procurement

Scores: 
3

Matt Ellis – January 17, 2012

Public procurement presents significant risk under the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Cases like Siemens Argentina, Siemens Venezuela, Johnson & Johnson, and Tenaris highlight the risk. Large amounts of money are at stake when the government procures things like roads, computer systems, oil extraction services, medical equipment, power stations, and textbooks.

Companies must interact directly with government officials. And government officials have pockets of discretion that can give rise to manipulation of the process. When corruption is involved, procurement decisions are no longer based on price, experience, and quality.

Xe (Blackwater) Hires Disgraced AIG "Compliance Czar"

Scores: 
2

Bea Edwards – September 16, 2011

Last week Corporate Counsel reported that infamous military security firm Xe (previously Blackwater) has hired Suzanne Folsom as its first chief regulatory/compliance officer and deputy general counsel.

The article quotes Folsom crony and former AIG General Counsel Anastasia "Stasia" Kelly, gushing about her friend's talents:

Stop Canada’s foreign aid waste: NGO

Scores: 
0

Jessica Murphy – June 14, 2011

Canadian taxpayers aren't getting the most bang for their nearly five billion in foreign aid bucks, says Engineers Without Borders.

The aid organization stopped by Parliament Hill Tuesday to push the government to sign on to the U.K.-led International Aid Transparency Initiative, or IATI, which it claims could save $7 million a year in funds squandered on red tape.

In Romania, bribery is a health problem

Scores: 
2

Dan Bilefsky – November 3, 2009

BUCHAREST — Alina Lungu, 30, says she did everything necessary to ensure a healthy pregnancy in Romania: She ate organic food, swam daily and bribed her gynecologist with an extra €200 in cash, paid in monthly increments of €25 handed over discreetly in white envelopes.

Another bribe of €25, or about $32, went to a nurse to guarantee an epidural. Even the orderly reaped an extra €10 to make sure he didn't drop her from the stretcher. But on the day of her delivery, she says, her gynecologist never arrived.

Pages

Subscribe to World Bank